Author: Chris Mears

“The days are just packed”

Chris

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Manheim Industrial Railroad

Just some random photo links I’m forwarding to myself for the someday file and a tea break well spent.

Each link follows the same format:
Photographer
Photo caption as a direct quote
Link

Chris


Bob Kise CR 7567 North Heading up the old Cornwall RR connection
http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/showPicture.aspx?id=3439215

Seth Eberly East penn rail way had to bring in the Middletown & New Jersey # 2 because Tropical storm Lee washed out the trackbed.
http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/showPicture.aspx?id=3037565

Seth Eberly M&NJ #2 idels away after just shifting some tank cars around at farrel gas.
http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/showPicture.aspx?id=3038849

Paul Koprowski After many years of working in upstate New York as the only active locomotive on the line, Middletown & New Jersey 2 now lives a quieter life of shifting tank cars at the East Penn’s Manheim operation.
http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/showPicture.aspx?id=3273456

Paul Koprowski The only markings left that tell of this unit’s history with the Middletown & New Jersey Railway in upstate New York.
http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/showPicture.aspx?id=3273458

Paul Koprowski The East Penn Railroad’s Manheim operation has received some new power in the form of ex-SP B30-7 7874. Built by GE in 1979, it was moved here from the ESPN Lancaster Northern line to work with MNJ 44-ton 2 on former Reading rails. Seen from the Manheim Community Park which borders the tracks.
http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/showPicture.aspx?id=4824473

Kevin Painter ESPN 7874
http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/showPicture.aspx?id=4825190

Kevin Painter MNJ2
http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/showPicture.aspx?id=4825191

Ken Sherta This switcher is used by an oil company to move cars on a spur that was the Lebanon branch of the former Columbia & Reading.
http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/showPicture.aspx?id=3638332

The tease

Traipsing around town, the thought occurred to me: It’s not getting to see the thing that’s so exciting as the moment you are first invited to. That moment when you don’t have to decide if, whatever it is, is important or not.

VIA Kentville

I promise there’s model railway content coming shortly but for now I’m between errands and wanted to express that thought.

Good morning

Coffee and an almond croissant from Two if by Sea and a park bench overlooking the marina. The backdrop is the Dartmouth yard. Train 407 just tied on its power and 511’s crew will leave shortly to drag another load of gypsum hoppers from Milford to Wright’s Cove. The yard is packed with autoracks and all is right with the world. 


Take care
Chris

“It just feels so cool”

MRJ254cover-min

My walk after work today brought me to Atlantic News, on Morris Street, here in Halifax. There amongst a generous assortment of model railway magazines were three copies of Model Railway Journal number 254. For the first time ever, I have just bought myself a copy of this magazine in person! Every copy of this that I have arrived in the mail. Often by way of exceptionally generous help of friends in England.

It probably sounds silly to confess, but it just feels so cool to just wander into a store and buy a copy of this like it was any other magazine.


More random thoughts…

I don’t always care for MRJ. That’s okay because it’s just a magazine. Regardless of whether or not I liked the copy, the fact that I probably only have it thanks to the generous help of a friend instills in each copy a memory of that relationship, which in turn makes each copy pretty darn good.

I hadn’t even intended to go for the walk. I was sort of cranky (really…a bit anxious and a little melancholic just for fun) after work today and thought I should probably just see what some wandering and sunshine might do. Stop number one was my first visit to The Wired Monk for coffee and a slice of carrot cake. First time visit to this really pleasant little coffee shop and it was delightful. I’m looking forward to going back soon.

 

Matchbox (part 2?)

I wanted to revisit my earlier post that introduced a model railway design that I had named “The Matchbox”. The vision for that design remains clear in my head but as I re-read that post I wonder if I could have done a better job of explaining the basic idea?

Hopefully, the following illustrations and text will be helpful.

matchbox2-1

Above is the basic idea. Borrowing a dimension inherited from a wall in our apartment, it’s footprint is six feet in length and nine inches deep. I’ve shaded in the major construction components to provide some initial bearings. For the sake of this exercise, let’s not get too bogged down in details like the size of individual elements and focus instead on how the design works.

“layout” (red)

As the name implies this is our diorama representing the complete scene; track, trains, and all. The complete area is scenicked and finished to a presentation standard.

“staging drawer” (brown)

Equal in area to the complete footprint of the layout, the staging drawer is deep enough to store rolling stock inside and is open along the top.

“fascia” (grey)

Wrapping around the exposed faces of the layout, the fascia covers the complete front expanse of the layout. When the layout is in the closed position, this completely hides the horizontal seam between the two layers and the secret buried deep inside.

matchbox2-2

“backdrop” (blue)

Equal in length to the layout and reaching to about twenty-four inches above the finished scene.

“valance” (black)

The valance frames the top of the layout and also contains the lighting rig.

“cassette style switching lead” (white)

Instead of storing the cars loose, they are pre-loaded onto cassette-style staging units. Complete cassettes are stored inside the staging area within this matchbox’s envelope.

The staging drawers, valance, and the backdrop remain fixed (e.g. “to the wall”). They do not move. So, in terms of how the layout changes during an operating session:

  1. The layout is opened up by sliding it out into the hallway
  2. A cassette (containing a train) is selected and lifted out of the staging drawer
  3. The cassette is attached to the end of the layout and left in place until the end of the operating session
  4. Once in place, the cassette bridges over the staging area
  5. At the end of the operating session, the cassette is returned to the staging drawing
  6. The layout is slid back into the original closed position

It’s really that simple.

Traditionally, a model railway remains fixed in place. If we need that extra length of track, we achieve it by adding to the layout by attaching staging to a free end like a pier jutting from the land out into the sea. In this case, I propose moving the layout out of the way to make room for the extra track we need. This is made easy by mounting the layout on a set of drawer slides built onto the top of the integral storage unit. It slides open and closed like a matchbox and in doing so, both reveals the trains stored inside and also evolves the plan from static diorama to operating model railway.

matchbox2-3 end drawer

As I noted, I based this idea around a plan that was six feet in length. At most, I would expect to only need to open it up to add about two feet of additional length (i.e. where that staging cassette is attached). That leaves a space at the other end of the board where a second drawer could be incorporated. It could be used to store more trains but I suspect it would be better utilized as a placed to store those tools I use most often.

matchbox2-4 front drawer

Instead of the drawer opening from the end, it could just as easily open from the front of the layout. If I were storing tools inside, this might actually be the better idea since it could open directly over my work table.

I find the idea of sliding the model railway around novel and amusing. What I find attractive about the plan isn’t so much borne of this amusement as it is the way that the design provides places to store extra models, tools, and materials. Typically these find places on shelving near the layout but they often look cluttered. In this design, they are tucked cleanly, invisibly inside. Between uses, all that is shown to the casual viewer is the model set.

Rick de Candido has written two really neat blog posts in which he presents some terrific suggestions on how staging cassettes could be built. He presents an idea that not only makes it easy to move an entire train but to do so in a way where the cars are protected while in flight. Even my modest cassettes are in the range of twenty-four inches in length and I feel that is approaching about as long a cassette I could safely maneuver without accidentally dumping everything on the floor. Check out Rick’s blog posts by clicking on this link: https://fillmoreavenueroundhouse.wordpress.com/2017/06/21/staging-cassette-mk2/

I’ve had a lot of fun playing around with these sketches. I hope this article has been useful in helping to further explain the idea.

“I am not a layout designer…”

The posts all start with a variation of the phrase “I am not a layout designer”. Each time Rick de Candido presents an idea that is unique, yet undoubtedly draws from the experiences he’s gained from building the Fillmore Avenue Terminal and what he’s learned about his own relationship with the hobby. You can see the family resemblance in broad, aesthetic terms but it’s clear that none of these ideas is a simple rehash of a common theme like: shelf layout done three ways.

The conceptual plans all seem to be grouped into a blog category titled Tech  – Layout Concepts and if this all goes to plan the link below not only invites you to his blog but loads this particular series of posts:

https://fillmoreavenueroundhouse.wordpress.com/category/tech-layout-concepts/

Elsewhere on the site are a series of articles, each devoted to describing one type of train operation on the layout. I enjoy re-reading these articles and often think that they could stand as individual layout design studies. A favourite among these is the one in which Rick writes about managing express cars received from trains that have just arrived or are being prepared for the next train out:

https://fillmoreavenueroundhouse.wordpress.com/2015/12/08/express-car-ops/

Through detailed text and annotated with terrific photos, articles like the above describe how a layout could be created based on only this extract. Each time I’ve read Express Car Ops, I’ve caught myself thinking just how fun that job would be to hold at Fillmore and, equally, just how fun this alone would be if this was all the layout I had at home.

This style of writing is something I wish we were treated to more often in the hobby. The railroad, both real and in model form, is a community of activities. As with any community there will be stories that we are attracted to and that draw our attention in. In doing so, we’re invited to get to know the greater story on a more personal level since we’re provided a chance to relate our story to the one we’re discovering.

Maybe not a layout designer like the ones we typically get in the pages of the latest track plans book but I’m grateful for that. We could use more people that aren’t.

Thanks Rick. You’ve created something really good both in the model railway and also the website dedicated to telling its story to the rest of us. I appreciate the work and have always enjoyed checking in.


A close runner-up in Fillmore extracts that I think would make a superb layout would be an extract based on the activities Rick describes in Service Train – Coal:

https://fillmoreavenueroundhouse.wordpress.com/2016/01/17/service-train-coal/

This train serves to deliver coal to the coaling station and boiler house in the scene. That detailed coaling tower would make a superb signature scene instantly identifying the story of the layout and each operating session would be devoted to the acts of a single shunting engine, moving coal hoppers around.